Dixie Land

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Melody - Seq. by Barry Taylor
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Daniel D. Emmett, 1859

O, I wish I was in the land of cotton
Old times there are not forgotten
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
In Dixie Land where I was born in
Early on one frosty mornin'
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Chorus:
O, I wish I was in Dixie! Hooray! Hooray!
In Dixie Land I'll take my stand
To live and die in Dixie
|: Away, away, away down south in Dixie! :|
2. Old Missus marry Will, the weaver,
William was a gay deceiver
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
But when he put his arm around her
He smiled as fierce as a forty pounder
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Chorus:

3. His face was sharp as a butcher's cleaver
But that did not seem to grieve her
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Old Missus acted the foolish part
And died for a man that broke her heart
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Chorus:


Dixie Land, or Dixie, as it is generally called, the most popular song of the South, was written by Daniel D. Emmett, of Ohio. In 1859, Mr. Emmett was a member of "Bryant's minstrels", then playing in New York. One Saturday evening he was asked by Mr. Bryant to furnish a new song to be used in the performances the following week. On Monday morning, Mr. Emmett took to the rehearsal the words and music of Dixie. The song soon became the favorite all over the land. In 1860, an entertainment was given in New Orleans. The leader had some difficulty in selecting a march for his chorus. After trying several he decided upon Dixie. It was taken up by the people, sung upon the streets and soon carried to the battlefields where it became the great inspirational song of the Confederate Army.

Many different words were written to the tune. Those by Albert Pike, of Arkansas, were much used and are, perhaps the most worthy of mention.

Like Yankee Doodle, the original words of Dixie voice no great patriotic sentiment, and the music is not of a lofty character. Yet it stirred the hearts of those who fought for the "Flag of Dixie".

Today, to the music of these two songs, there echoes the tread of a united people whose hearts are moved alike by the stirring strains, and who as they lsiten are ready to say with uplifted hands, bared brows, and reverent lips, "We give our heads and our hearts to God, and our Country". - From The Golden Book of Favorite Songs, 1915.

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