A New Song of an Orange

The Rare Vertue of an Orange

Popery purged and expelled out of the Nation

Line
Melody - "The Pudding"
Line

From 1688

Good People come buy
The Fruit that I cry,
That now is in Season, tho' Winter is nigh;
'Twill do you all good,
And sweeten your Blood,
I'm sure it will please when you've once understood
'Tis an Orange.

2. It's Cordial Juice,
Does much Vigour produce,
I may well recommend it to every Mans use,
Tho' some it quite chills,
And with fear almost kills,
Yet certain each Healthy Man benefit feels
By an Orange.

3. To make Claret go down,
Sometimes there is found
A jolly good Health, to pass pleasntly round;
But yet, I'll protest,
Without any Jest,
No Flavour is better than that of the taste
Of an Orange.

4. Perhaps you may think
To Peters they Stink,
Because from our Neighbors they'r brought over Sea
Yet sure, 'tis presum'd
They may be perfum'd
By th' scent of good cloves, for they may be stuck
In an Orange.

5. If they'll Cure the Ayls
In England and Wales,
Whose Meat to their Stomachs long have not agreed,
Since we're subject to Cast,
Let's better the taste,
(Still being careful lest it Curdle at last)
With an Orange.

6. Old Stories rehearse,
In Prose and Verse,
How a Welsh child was found by loving of cheese
Let Sympathy shew,
How others can Spew,
When once they'r brought to the hated Vied
Of an Orange.

7. Tho' the Mobile Bawl,
Like the Devil and all,
For Religion, Property, Justice and Laws;
Yet in very good sooth,
I'll tell you the Truth,
There nothing is better to stop a Man's Mouth
Than an Orange.

8. We are certainly told,
That by Adam of old,
Himself and his Bearns for an Apple was sold;
And who knows but his Son,
By Serpents undone,
And many besides may at last loose their own
For an Orange.

Good People come buy
The Fruit that I cry,
That now is in season, tho' Winter is nigh;
'Twill do you all good,
And sweeten your Blood;
I'm sure it will please when you've once understood
'Tis an Orange.

2. Its Cordial Juice,
Does much vigour produce:
I may well recommend it to every Mans use,
Tho' some it quite chills,
And with fear almost kills,
Yet certain each Healthy Man benefit feels
By an Orange.

3. Perhaps you may think
That the Iesuits stink,
Because that they can't get away with their Chink;
For Hemp is their Doom
If they dare to preseum,
To tarry so long as to smell the Perfume
Of an Orange.

4. Dear Teague and his Fellow's
Come over the Main,
And thought in Great-Brittain like Landlords to Reign;
They play'd for our Houses,
And lost them again,
Some of those deer-Foys now has met with their bane,
By an Orange

5. The Fryars and Iesuits
Thought to excell,
By singing, and Ringing their Tantany- Bell
But there is nothing
That can e're do so well,
The Poyson of Popery quite to expell,
As an Orange.

6. There's Old father Peters,
Religious and Chaste,
Has left all his Lasses that once he embrac'd
And now he is scowr'd
Away in all haste,
Because that he cannot endure the sharp taste
Of an Orange.

7. Old Stories rehearse,
In Prose and in Verse,
How a Welsh child was found by loving of cheese
Then the smelling sence,
Now may prove the true Prince
And all the whole Nation of folly convince
By an Orange

8. If they Cure the ayls
Of England and Wales,
And with the Old Iesuits fill all the Gaols,
Who strove the whole Nation,
Alas! to deceive,
And now at old Tyburn let them take their leave
Of an Orange

9. Tho' the Mobile bawl,
Like the Devil and all,
For Religion, Property, Justice and Laws,
Yet in very good sooth,
I'll tell you the truth,
There nothing is bettere to stop a man's mouth
Than an Orange.


From The Peyps Ballads, Harvard, 1930, Vol. III

Line
| Song Index | Home Page |
Line


From The Peyps Ballads, Harvard, 1930, Vol. III

Line
| Song Index | Home Page |
Line