The Protecting Brewer

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Melody - "Greensleeves"; Seq. by Barry Taylor
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from Rump Songs, 1662

A Brewer may be a Burgess grave,
And carry the matter so fine and so brave,
That he the better may play the Knave,
Which no body can deny.
A Brewer may be a Parliament-man,
For there the Knavery first began,
And brew most cunning plots he can,
Which no body can deny.

2. A brewer may put on a Nabal face,
And march to the Wars with such a grace,
That he may get a Captains place,
Which no body can deny.
A Brewer may speak so Wonderous well,
That he may raise strange things to tell,
And so to be made a Collonel,
Which no body can deny.

3. A Brewer may make his foes to flee,
And raise his Fortunes, so that he,
Lieutenant-General may be,
Which no body can deny.
A Brewer he may be all in all,
And raise his Powers both great and small,
That he may be a Lord General,
Which no body can deny.

4. A Brewer may be like a Fox in a Cub,
And teach a Lecture out of a Tub,
And give the wicked world a rub,
Which no body can deny.
A Brewer by's Excise and Rate,
Will promise his Army he knows what,
And set it upon the Colledge-gate,
Which no body can deny.

5. Methinks I hear one say to me,
Pray why not a Brewer be,
Lord-Chancellor o'th' University,
Which no body can deny.
A Brewer may be as bold as Hector,
When he has drunk off his cup of Nectar,
And a Brewer may be a Lord Protector,
Which no body can deny.

6. Now here remains the strangest thing,
How this Brewer about his Liquor did bring,
To be an Emperour, or a King,
Which no body can deny.
A Brewer may do what he thinks well,
And rob the Church and State, to sell,
His soul unto the devil of hell,
Which no body can deny.


Oliver Cromwell was a brewer by trade, and this song is a scathing attack on him and his less-than-religious trade.

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